Oct. 29, 2021

JOHN DINKEL | GAS - ELECTRIC - STEAM | Women preferred electric! | 3 competing energies | JOHN DINKEL EXPLAINS!!

0:20 Gasoline was a byproduct of oil that was coming out of the ground. Nobody knew what the hell to do with this stuff. It was worthless 0:58 John D. Rockefeller 1. put a lot of support into the development of gasoline-powered engines and 2. he built...


0:20 Gasoline was a byproduct of oil that was coming out of the ground. Nobody knew what the hell to do with this stuff. It was worthless

0:58 John D. Rockefeller 1. put a lot of support into the development of gasoline-powered engines and 2. he built service stations. He made tons of money by selling a waste product that nobody else wanted

3:08 Gasoline was a very local, craft product

3:32 electric vehicles were more expensive than gasoline. Women 100 to one gravitated to electric vehicles because they weren't dirty and the biggest issue was, she didn't have to crank it

4:17 it wasn't until Kettering came along with the electric starter that we were able to really put women behind the wheel

Transcript

Unknown Speaker  0:00  
You know, why gasoline? One out?

Jeff Sterns  0:05  
Money

Unknown Speaker  0:08  
Well, ultimately became money. But back back in the day, we were we were pulling oil out of the ground. And we were using it to oil all the gears of machinery and whatnot. And well,

Jeff Sterns  0:23  
I mean, they were using whale oil for oil and gears and streetlights.

Unknown Speaker  0:27  
So it was a byproduct of this, of this oil that was coming out of the ground, you know what it was, you know, it was just liquid cold gasoline. And nobody knew what the hell to do with this stuff. It was it was worthless, but you had to like you got it with, with the, with the, with the crude oil that you wanted to use. The other thing I

Jeff Sterns  0:48  
always thought, I always thought a refinery took crude oil and made it into gasoline, I didn't realize gasoline was one of the compounds coming out of the ground with crude oil.

Unknown Speaker  0:58  
That's exactly what it was. It was a byproduct, when people discovered that you could make an engine. And you could run it on this crude stuff called gasoline, because you could ignite it and it would burn. There was the guy Vaman named John D. Rockefeller, who was heavily into the oil industry at the time. And he did two things. He put a lot of support into the development of gasoline powered engines. But even more than that, is he built service stations. So mean, as America was developing, and cars were developing, you could only go a certain distance where the if you had an electric vehicle, you could only go a certain distance before the batteries ran out. And if you had a steam engine, well, you'd have to stop and find water. So you could fill up the boiler again and get that hot and start going again. Gasoline has some real advantages to compared to the other types of fuel. But it still had the same disadvantages. He drifted into drove 50 Miles 100 Miles, and you ran out of gas Where the hell are you gonna get more gas. So John D. Rockefeller, built the first service stations, gas stations, along various routes going out of major cities, so that when you were running low, you could stop and fill up. So he made tons of money by selling a waste product that nobody else wanted called gasoline, to run on engines. And that really was the thing that that that pushed gasoline powered engines to the forefront of development.

Jeff Sterns  2:45  
So John Rockefeller puts the service stations on main roads going out of major metros so that people could fill up before Rockefeller service stations. Where were people getting fuel just a local service station? Or was it like some kind of craft business where people would go and get some gasoline?

Unknown Speaker  3:08  
It would have to have been something very, very local. And just realize back then, that we were very early in development of, you know, one cylinder engines and whatnot. And so you didn't have gasoline available for very many places. It just wasn't that available initially. And the fact is, an electric vehicle was more expensive than the gasoline engines have an equivalent time. But women 100 to one gravitated to electric vehicles, a because they weren't dirty and sweaty, like the gasoline engines work. And the biggest issue was, he didn't have to crank it and can having to crank a gasoline engine really was the death knell for most women being able to drive a woman could get behind the wheel of an Eevee and click you off. But the but the electric vehicles were typically more expensive than the gasoline counterparts. And it wasn't until Kettering came along with the electric startup that we were able to really put women behind the wheel. And that Kedah Kettering, and Kettering Institute care in a lab that was all what became part of what was part of GM. And Kettering was the guy who invented the electric starter.

Jeff Sterns  4:33  
Well, I mean, I don't know if that was a plus or minus I think then they wanted to vote. I mean, they were starting to feel some freedom. So I don't know. This has been Jeff Sterns connected through cars

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

John Dinkel

R&T Illustrated AutoDictionary and others on Mazda

John Dinkel earned BS and MS degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan and is an automotive industry expert with over 40 years experience. His areas of expertise include engineering, journalism, testing and analysis, product development, product planning, advertising, marketing, website development and content, internet automotive retailing and public relations. 
Most recently he has been a consultant to privately-held companies specializing in the commercialization of alternative automotive powertrain vehicles/technologies, the importation of Chinese vehicles into North America, an automotive crowdfunding site called FundingGarage and an automotive retail website.

Motivo specializes in developing new products for complex engineering problems.

Dinkel was a competitive race driver for the Bakeracing Corvette team (two SCCA Championships), worked directly with Goodyear in the development of the Gatorback tire for showroom stock racing and developed the first computerized road testing equipment in the automotive industry. Dinkel was Editor of Road & Track, one of the most popular consumer automobile magazines in America, developed some of the earliest Internet-based automotive material and helped create an automotive website. Dinkel is author of the Road & Track Illustrated Automotive Dictionary and has written three books on Mazda and a comprehensive history of Toyota. He is a member of SAE, SCCA, Road Racing Drivers Club and the Motor Press Guild, serving as this organization’s president in 1991. Dinkel is also a regular contributor to the SAE’s Automotive Engineering magazine and a variety of automotive magazines and websites, including, www.SAE.org and http://wheelstv.tv.